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How addiction counselling helped this recovering alcoholic

Dennis, 57, from Oxford decided to turn to Port of Call and receive addiction counselling and therapy sessions in order to achieve an addiction free life. Dennis’ drinking problem stemmed from the death of his wife, but now he is turning over a new leaf, living a life free from alcohol.

what is addiction counselling

Dennis’ story

Drinking has always been my way of relaxing but it’s never been a problem for me. Alright, I like to get drunk every now and then – not as much as I used to in my younger days – but I’ve always considered myself to be in control. None of that hooligan behaviour that you see on the streets nowadays.

It used to be fine to do that. Then the Government brought in all these guidelines that I just can’t get my head around at all. I suppose since retiring from work, and the loss of my wife, the visits to the pub slowly got earlier and earlier. Of late, I’d been waiting for the pub to open and often stopped off for a bottle of spirits on the way home.

My life had basically become very small and very depressing. That’s why I decided to contact Port of Call. I heard about them when I went to visit my doctor. Although I was dubious at first, they listened to my story and helped me find the right alcohol counselling and therapy sessions for my needs.

What is addiction counselling?

When Port of Call recommended alcohol counselling and therapy, I wasn’t very keen. I didn’t see the benefit of sitting in a room and talking about myself and my problems. I had no idea how alcohol counselling and therapy worked and I had no idea how it would help me.

In reality, the experience was different to what I had ever imagined. I was reluctant to attend and if I’m being honest, scared of what people would think of me. I was surprised by the lack of judgement in the room, everyone was so supportive and I walked out of my first session like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders.

In total, I went to see my counsellor, on and off, for about 12 weeks. I sat down with a professional and other people who were going through the same things as me. Now I actually look forward to my alcohol counselling and therapy sessions, something I never thought I would say. I’ve made some lifelong friends. I’ve found that not drinking is a better way of life and will quite happily sit down with a cup of tea instead of grabbing a beer.

How does addiction counselling work?

Over the 12 weeks, I found myself opening up to my therapist, discussing things that I usually kept to myself. I think it was because someone was actually there to listen to me and it’s harder to deny a problem when you say it out loud. I started to understand my problem and how unnatural my drinking habits were and eventually, with the help of my counsellor, I started to understand where the problem stemmed from.

My counsellor really helped me to open up and I started to realise things affected me more than I thought. It turns out the way I was coping with my problems was through drinking and alcohol, but now I recognise the problem I believe I have better control of my life.

One of the main benefits of receiving alcohol counselling and therapy is that I have found new ways of dealing with my problems. Instead of turning to the bottle, I now have a whole host of ways to remain sober and handle problems in an effective manner, helping me to remain sober.

I’m happier and healthier than I have been for a long while and it’s all down to Port of Call, and my doctor, for helping me to change my habits.

What are the recommended alcohol limits?

Advice on the intake of alcohol for men and women changed in 2016, to state both males and females should consume no more than 14 units per week. Medical experts have also stated that consuming any level of alcohol carries risk and the problems shouldn’t be overlooked.

Dame Sally Davies, the chief medical officer for England, said: “Drinking any level of alcohol regularly carries a health risk for anyone, but if men and women limit their intake to no more than 14 units a week it keeps the risk of illness like cancer and liver disease low.”

Make us your first Port of Call. If you, or a loved one, are dealing with alcohol addiction we can help you to access the right addiction help at the right time. Take the first step today by speaking to one of our advisers for free on 0800 002 9010.

Disclaimer: Names and certain details have been changed to protect the identity of case study participants.

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